Google Chrome installation for Ubuntu

With a few simple steps, Google Chrome can be installed on Ubuntu.


wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add -


sudo sh -c 'echo "deb http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google.list'


sudo apt-get update


sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable

or…


sudo apt-get install google-chrome-beta

Clear Ubuntu ‘bash’ history

After a lot of use, your history file can become full of a lot of old commands… once in a while, it can be useful (and safer) to clean them up.

NOTE: this can be especially important if you have ever used a password as a command line parameter as it is stored without encryption in a text file.

Preferred:

cat /dev/null > ~/.bash_history && history -c && exit

Also useful:

history -c
history -w

REFERENCES:

Install Fail2Ban on Ubuntu to protect services

Many common adminstrative services such as VPN and SSH are exposed on known port numbers, unfortunately this makes it easy for hackers to use tools to attempt to access the systems. Use of countermeasures such as Fail2Ban can block them after a few failed attempts.

Installation Steps:

  1. sudo apt-get install fail2ban
  2. sudo cp /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf /etc/fail2ban/jail.local
  3. sudo vi /etc/fail2ban/jail.local
  4. Update:
    destemail & sender
  5. OPTIONAL:
    Splunk:
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/fail2ban.log -index main -sourcetype Fail2Ban

    Splunk (manual):
    sudo vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf

    [monitor:///var/log/fail2ban.log]
    disabled = false
    index = main
    sourcetype = Fail2Ban

  6. sudo service fail2ban restart

REFERENCES:

Adding OpenSSH server logs to Splunk

By default, in most Linux distros, OpenVPN log output goes to the authlog, which is usually at /var/log/auth.log, as such it is trivial to add them to Splunk monitoring:

Splunk:
sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/auth.log -index main -sourcetype OpenSSH

Splunk (manual):
sudo vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf


[monitor:///var/log/auth.log]
disabled = false
index = main
sourcetype = OpenSSH

REFERENCES:

Adding OpenVPN logs to Splunk on Ubuntu

By default, in most Linux distros, OpenVPN log output goes to the syslog, which is usually at /var/log/syslog. However, your config files can set the logfile location explicitly, as shown below:

  1. sudo vi /etc/openvpn/server.conf
  2. Change or add:
    log-append /var/log/openvpn.log
  3. Restart to use the new config:
    sudo service openvpn restart
  4. Add to Splunk forwarder:
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/openvpn.log -index main -sourcetype OpenVPN

    Splunk (manual):
    sudo vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf

    [monitor:///var/log/openvpn.log]
    disabled = false
    index = main
    sourcetype = OpenVPN

REFERENCES:

Selenium HtmlUnit driver separated in 2.53.0

I’ve been a user of Selenium testing for several years, though I noticed that some classes related to the HtmlUnit WebDriver were missing after upgrading from 2.52.0 to 2.53.0. After some research, I discovered that it is now a separate dependency allowing for a separate release cycle. Additionally, if you don’t use this (relatively generic) webdriver, you will no longer need to have it in your binaries.

Here’s all you need to do to add it to your Maven projects for testing.

In your pom.xml file:

<properties>
<selenium.version>2.53.0</selenium.version>
<htmlunitdriver.version>2.20</htmlunitdriver.version>
</properties>
<dependencies>
<dependency>
<groupId>org.seleniumhq.selenium</groupId>
<artifactId>selenium-java</artifactId>
<version>${selenium.version}</version>
<scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
<groupId>org.seleniumhq.selenium</groupId>
<artifactId>htmlunit-driver</artifactId>
<version>${htmlunitdriver.version}</version>
<scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
</dependencies>

REFERENCES:

Squid3 Proxy on Ubuntu

Using a personal proxy server can be helpful for a variety of reasons, such as:

  • Performance – network speed and bandwidth
  • Security – filtering and monitoring
  • Debugging – to trace activity

Here are some simple steps to get you started,  obviously you will need to further “harden” security to make it production ready!


sudo apt-get install squid3


cd /etc/squid3/
sudo mv squid.conf squid.orig
sudo vi squid.conf

NOTE: the following configuration works, but will likely need to be adapted for your specific usage.


http_port 3128
visible_hostname proxy.EXAMPLE.com
auth_param digest program /usr/lib/squid3/digest_file_auth -c /etc/squid3/passwords
#auth_param digest program /usr/lib/squid3/digest_pw_auth -c /etc/squid3/passwords
auth_param digest realm proxy
auth_param basic credentialsttl 4 hours
acl authenticated proxy_auth REQUIRED
acl localnet src 10.0.0.0/8 # RFC 1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src 172.16.0.0/12 # RFC 1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src 192.168.0.0/16 # RFC 1918 possible internal network
acl localnet src fc00::/7 # RFC 4193 local private network range
acl localnet src fe80::/10 # RFC 4291 link-local (directly plugged) machines
#acl SSL_ports port 443
#http_access deny to_localhost
#http_access deny CONNECT !SSL_ports
http_access allow localnet
http_access allow localhost
http_access allow authenticated
via on
forwarded_for transparent

Create the users and passwords:

sudo apt-get install apache2-utils (required for htdigest)
sudo htdigest -c /etc/squid3/passwords proxy user1
sudo htdigest /etc/squid3/passwords proxy user2

Open up firewall port (if enabled):

sudo ufw allow 3128

Restart the server and tail the logs:

sudo service squid3 restart
sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log

OTHER FILE LOCATIONS:

/var/spool/squid3
/etc/squid3

MONITORING with Splunk…

sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/squid3/access.log -index main -sourcetype Squid3
sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/squid3/cache.log -index main -sourcetype Squid3

REFERENCES:

HTML5 Link Prefetching

Link prefetching is used to identify a resource that might be required by the next navigation, and that the user agent SHOULD fetch, such that the user agent can deliver a faster response once the resource is requested in the future.


<link rel="prefetch" href="http://www.example.com/images/sprite.png" />

<link rel="prefetch" href="/images/sprite.png" />

Supported in:

  • MSIE 11+/Edge
  • Firefox 3.5+ (for HTTPS)
  • Chrome
  • Opera

REFERENCES:

SonarLint for Eclipse IDE

I’ve always been fan of tools for automation of development and testing. I’ve used SonarQube for a long time, and even connect it to my IDE (usually Eclipse), so that I can act on any warnings for code as I’m working on it.

SonarLint takes that to a new level, as it gives notifications before the code is even commited for SonarQube to analyze.

While the instructions here are for Eclipse, SonarLint is also available for IntelliJ IDEA, VisualStudio, and as a command line tool for download from the website.

Eclipse Update Site:
http://www.sonarlint.org/eclipse/

REFERENCES:

HTML5 preconnect

In addition to dns-prefetch, you can take browser performance one step further by actually creating a new connection to a resource.

By initiating an early connection, which includes the DNS lookup, TCP handshake, and optional TLS negotiation, you allow the user agent to mask the high latency costs of establishing a connection.

Supported in:

  • Firefox 39+ (Firefox 41 for crossorigin)
  • Chrome 46+
  • Opera


<link rel="preconnect" href="//example.com" />
<link rel="preconnect" href="//cdn.example.com" crossorigin />

REFERENCES: