HTML5 download attribute

Example

The download attribute allows for the downloaded filename to be specified to be something different than the name in the url.

This is available only on the A tag when an href attribute is already specified and works similarly to setting the header as:
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="filename.pdf"

NOTE: this is not currently available in IE, Edge(prior to 13) or IOS Safari.

References:

RetireJS javascript libary vulnerability scanning with Maven

It’s important to note that even though your site is using a vulnerable library, that does not necessarily mean your site is vulnerable. It depends on whether and how your site exercises
the vulnerable code. That said, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

I identified this method of using the asset after reading the instructions for the Burp/Gulp scanner from h3xstream after the following section caught my eye:
https://github.com/h3xstream/burp-retire-js#maven-plugin-, it contained a small reference to Maven and even showed output but no configuration for use. A couple of attempts later I came up with the following:

Add to pom.xml:

<build>
<plugins>
<plugin>
<groupId>com.h3xstream.retirejs</groupId>
<artifactId>retirejs-maven-plugin</artifactId>
<version>2.1.0</version>
<executions>
<execution>
<id>scanProjectJavascript</id>
<phase>install</phase>
<goals>
<goal>scan</goal>
</goals>
</execution>
</executions>
</plugin>
</plugins>
</build>

After adding this to your pom.xml, the console output for each build will contain information regarding each vulnerable JavaScript library.

One small problem exists in the current version, use behind corporate firewalls can often be blocked, resulting in an error in the console and use of an older version of the vulnerability library to be used in scans.

Error example:

[ERROR] Exception while loading the repository (Most likely unable to access the internet) java.net.UnknownHostException: raw.githubusercontent.com

See the following for updates:
https://github.com/h3xstream/burp-retire-js/issues/8

See https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2013-A9-Using_Components_with_Known_Vulnerabilities.

REFERENCES:

Website testing with SortSite

SortSite is a popular desktop software for testing of web applications for broken links, browser compatibility, accessibility and common spelling errors. It is also available as a web application known as “OnDemand“.

You can generate a free sample test of your website at:
http://try.powermapper.com/Demo/SortSite

REFERENCES:

Browser capabilities comparison testing

Browsers tend to evolve quickly, but they often do not offer the same capabilities cross-platform. As a result of this, there are many standard tests available to the developers of browser software to test for compliance with modern web standards.

Before making use of a specific capability in your web application, it’s often best to determine which browsers can support it.

Defining word-break and word-wrap in CSS

I recently found a case where WebKit (Chromium, and Safari) was acting as if ‘overflow-x:visible;‘ was set in cases where text could not be wrapped inside a DIV due to a lack of spaces or hyphenation as it was a java stack trace. In this case I had to explicitly set the ‘word-wrap:break-word;‘ attribute for the problematic DIV.


.breakword { word-wrap: break-word; }

Also, for Unicode languages where there are other rules to complex to describe here…

.wordbreak { word-break: keep-all; }

Prevent resizing of HTML textarea in browser

Newer versions of Webkit based browsers (Safari & Chrome) as well as Firefox now allow users to resize HTML <textarea> elements by default. This can have unpredictable results on your user interfaces. Thankfully, you need only add a simple CSS attribute to prevent this newly default behavior.

textarea {resize:none;}

REFERENCES:

Safari/WebKit background flash on page load

I was recently working on a website that had a black/dark background and while the typical suite of browsers that I test with seemed fine, Safari showed an annoying white flash when the page was loading.

Some research into this lead to a startling discovery as I personally consider this a bug in the Safari browser’s rendering. It’s often referred to as FOUC (Flash of Unstyled Content). There are several methods that I’ve seen, most employ JavaScript or ordering of CSS files to hide the <body> prior to the page completely loading.

The simplest fix, while not elegant, is to an explicit ‘style’ attribute on the <html> tag.

<html style=”background-color:black;”>

Reference: