Install Fail2Ban on Ubuntu to protect services

Many common adminstrative services such as VPN and SSH are exposed on known port numbers, unfortunately this makes it easy for hackers to use tools to attempt to access the systems. Use of countermeasures such as Fail2Ban can block them after a few failed attempts.

Installation Steps:

  1. sudo apt-get install fail2ban
  2. sudo cp /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf /etc/fail2ban/jail.local
  3. sudo vi /etc/fail2ban/jail.local
  4. Update:
    destemail & sender
  5. OPTIONAL:
    Splunk:
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/fail2ban.log -index main -sourcetype Fail2Ban

    Splunk (manual):
    sudo vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf

    [monitor:///var/log/fail2ban.log]
    disabled = false
    index = main
    sourcetype = Fail2Ban

  6. sudo service fail2ban restart

REFERENCES:

Adding OpenVPN logs to Splunk on Ubuntu

By default, in most Linux distros, OpenVPN log output goes to the syslog, which is usually at /var/log/syslog. However, your config files can set the logfile location explicitly, as shown below:

  1. sudo vi /etc/openvpn/server.conf
  2. Change or add:
    log-append /var/log/openvpn.log
  3. Restart to use the new config:
    sudo service openvpn restart
  4. Add to Splunk forwarder:
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/openvpn.log -index main -sourcetype OpenVPN

    Splunk (manual):
    sudo vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf

    [monitor:///var/log/openvpn.log]
    disabled = false
    index = main
    sourcetype = OpenVPN

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Upgrade Splunk server

Initially this seemed a bit problematic for me. Each time the browser client is started it (by default) checks for a new server release and prompts the user to upgrade. The installation automatically identifies the currently installed version and takes the necessary steps to migrate configuration.

Steps are similar to initial installation.

  1. Download the appropriate build for your server (i386 vs. amd64)
  2. transfer to the server via sftp or other secure means
  3. sudo /opt/splunk/bin/splunk stop
  4. sudo dpkg -i splunk*
  5. sudo /opt/splunk/bin/splunk start
  6. … accept terms… Y
  7. MIGRATE “y”
  8. http://HOSTNAME:8000
  9. sudo /opt/splunk/bin/splunk enable boot-start

Install Splunk on Ubuntu

Splunk is a popular enterprise level tool for log collection, analysis and management. While you can obtain an enterprise license, most functions are available in the free community edition.

Setup is very easy:

  1. Download and move the .tar.gz file to the appropriate server (i386 vs. amd64)
  2. sudo dpkg -i splunk*.deb
  3. Start the server:

    sudo /opt/splunk/bin/splunk start

    The first time you run after installation or update you will have to accept terms.

  4. Access the admin screen:

    http://HOSTNAME:8000

    login (admin/changeme)
    change password

  5. Go to Settings/Forwarding * Receiving
    – add new (port 9997)
  6. Open firewall port (if enabled):

    sudo ufw allow 8000
  7. Now to start as a service…

    sudo /opt/splunk/bin/splunk enable boot-start

Competitors:

REFERENCES

Install Splunk Universal Forwarder on Ubuntu

After a while it can get tedious to access and review server logs via the command line. There are several tools available that can provide the same information in a graphical manner. Recently I’ve migrated to Splunk as there are both Enterprise and Free versions available.

  1. Of course, you’ll need a Splunk server installed first, as the forwarder is really just another (lighter) instance that will forward the log information to a central location.
  2. Download the system appropriate installer from:
    http://www.splunk.com/download/universalforwarder
  3. Check to see if you are running 32 or 64 bit OS.uname -aIf you see i686 you are 32 bit, if x86_64 you are 64 bit!
  4. Download, you’ll likely need a different version:sudo dpkg -i splunkforwarder-6.1.3-220630-linux-2.6-intel.deb
    or
    sudo dpkg -i splunkforwarder-6.1.3-220630-linux-2.6-amd64.deb
  5. Enable auto-start on reboot:cd /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/

sudo ./splunk enable boot-start

  1. Start the server:sudo service splunk start
  2. Set the password:

    The default ‘admin‘ password is ‘changeme‘ so we need to change it immediately to do anything else, or we will see errors in future steps.

    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk edit user admin -password YOUR_NEW_PASSWORD -auth admin:changeme

  3. Set the server:sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add forward-server YOUR_SERVER_ADDRESS:9997

    NOTE: if you get prompted for a splunk username/password you likely skipped the above step. Remember – the forwarder is a new ‘light’ installation of the server and as such has it’s own users!

  4. Enable some monitors on the box:Some common services and log locations to get you started…
    Apache2 HTTPd
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/apache2 -index main -sourcetype Apache2
    Tomcat7
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /opt/tomcat7/logs -index main -sourcetype Tomcat7
    MySQL
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/mysql -index main -sourcetype MySQL
    Postfix (SMTP)
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/mail.log -index main -sourcetype Postfix
    Squid3 (Proxy) 
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/squid/access.log -index main -sourcetype Squid3
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /var/log/squid/cache.log -index main -sourcetype Squid3

    SonarQube
    sudo /opt/splunkforwarder/bin/splunk add monitor /opt/sonar/logs -index main -sourcetype Sonar
  5. (OPTIONAL) Verify configuration by opening file at the following:sudo su
    vi /opt/splunkforwarder/etc/apps/search/local/inputs.conf
    exit
  6. You now should be able to log into your server and see new data flowing from the forwarder.

    NOTE: this requires you to enable ‘receiving’ of data on the port specified above, usually 9997.

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