Java Dependency Vulnerability scanning with Maven victims-enforcer

One of the OWASP guidelines for secure applications is to not use components with known vulnerabilities. Unfortunately it can be a very difficult and time consuming task to keep up with these manually, automation can save you countless hours!

See https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2013-A9-Using_Components_with_Known_Vulnerabilities.

NOTE: victims-enforcer can be used in conjunction with the OWASP dependency scanner. I have only found it to be problematic in ‘tycho’ builds.


<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-enforcer-plugin</artifactId>
<version>1.4.1</version>
<dependencies>
<dependency>
<groupId>com.redhat.victims</groupId>
<artifactId>enforce-victims-rule</artifactId>
<version>1.3.4</version>
<type>jar</type>
</dependency>
</dependencies>
<executions>
<execution>
<id>enforce-victims-rule</id>
<goals>
<goal>enforce</goal>
</goals>
<configuration>
<rules>
<rule implementation="com.redhat.victims.VictimsRule">
<!--
Check the project's dependencies against the database using
name and version. The default mode for this is 'warning'.

Valid options are:

disabled: Rule is still run but only INFO level messages and no errors.
warning : Rule will spit out a warning message but doesn't result in a failure.
fatal : Rule will spit out an error message and fail the build.
-->
<metadata>warning</metadata>

<!--
Check the project's dependencies against the database using
the SHA-512 checksum of the artifact. The default is fatal.

Valid options are:

disabled: Rule is still run but only INFO level messages and no errors.
warning : Rule will spit out a warning message but doesn't result in a failure.
fatal : Rule will spit out an error message and fail the build.
-->
<fingerprint>fatal</fingerprint>

<!--
Disables the synchronization mechanism. By default the rule will
attempt to update the database for each build.

Valid options are:

auto : Automatically update the database entries on each build.
daily : Update the database entries once per day.
weekly: Update the database entries once per week.
offline : Disable the synchronization mechanism.
-->
<updates>daily</updates><!-- was: auto -->

</rule>
</rules>
</configuration>
</execution>
</executions>
</plugin>

Vulnerability database is sourced from: https://victi.ms with backing from RedHat.

REFERENCES:

OWASP Dependency Vulnerability Scanning of Java JARs with Maven

One of the OWASP guidelines for secure applications is to not use components with known vulnerabilities. Unfortunately it can be a very difficult and time consuming task to keep up with these manually, automation can save you countless hours!

See https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2013-A9-Using_Components_with_Known_Vulnerabilities.

NOTE: OWASP dependency scanner can be used in conjunction with the victims-enforcer.

Add to your projects pom.xml:

<plugin>
<groupId>org.owasp</groupId>
<artifactId>dependency-check-maven</artifactId>
<version>1.3.4</version>
<executions>
<execution>
<goals>
<goal>check</goal>
</goals>
</execution>
</executions>
</plugin>

Each time you build, the plug-in will verify the assets against the list of known vulnerable libraries and report them in your output.

Vulnerability database is populated from: https://nvd.nist.gov.

NOTES:

  1. The example above is a very simple implementation, see the documentation for additional functions.
  2. The first use of the plug-in can take a long time as the vulnerability library must be installed locally before initial use.
  3. Similar functionality is available for Ant builds, if desired.

REFERENCES:

Code signing of java applets – using Maven

To sign your java assets during the maven build process, you can add the following to the pom.xml to make use of the values we established in the keystore creation step.

WARNING: for security and maintainability purposes, you should define the ‘configuration’ items in your local ‘settings.xml’ file instead of in the pom.xml as is done here for example only!


<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-jarsigner-plugin</artifactId>
<version>1.4</version>
<executions>
<execution>
<id>sign</id>
<goals>
<goal>sign</goal>
</goals>
</execution>
<execution>
<id>verify</id>
<goals>
<goal>verify</goal>
</goals>
</execution>
</executions>
<configuration>
<alias>selfsigned</alias><!-- ${project.name} -->
<keystore>selfsignkeys.store</keystore><!-- NOTE: you can also specify an absolute path here -->
<storepass>123456</storepass>
<keypass>123456</keypass>
</configuration>
</plugin>

REFERENCES:

Firefox 41+ extension signing

In the never-ending quest for browser security, Firefox has started implementing safeguards to only allow signed extensions. I found this out after upgrading to Firefox 41 as my installed version of “Deque FireEyes” stopped working. Thankfully, there is a workaround in Firefox 41, but it goes away in Firefox 42.

  • Firefox 40: warning only!
  • Firefox 41: workaround, via:

    about:config:
    xpinstall.signatures.required = false
  • Firefox 42: BLOCKED! unless signed

REFERENCES:

Deque FireEyes accessibility testing plugin

I’ve done a lot of accessibility testing and development work over my career. One of the many free tools that I use in that role is FireEyes. Deque also has some commercial packages for developer use.

FireEyes adds a new tab on the Firebug tab bar and adds the ability to analyze a web site for WCAG 2.0 Level A and AA and Section 508 accessibility violations. The Stand-Alone version of FireEyes is a browser plugin to the FireFox browser. It requires that the FireBug plugin already be installed

Requirements:

  • Firefox 31-41

    As of 2015aug21, the current version of the extension is NOT signed and will not execute on later versions. [See my later post on this topic]

  • FireBug 2.x – Do NOT install Firebug v3 alpha as the tab will not show.

NOTE: should be on Firebug tab labeled “Worldspace Fireyes”, but does not seem to be available in Firebug3.

NOTE: if you try to download in MSIE, you must rename the .zip to .xpi, and then open with Firefox.

REFERENCES:

Adding meta “viewport” for WordPress

Google recently changed their search algoritms to better recognize and weight “Mobile” support. This term is loosely defined in general, but to get your Google search “juice” you simply need to add a “viewport” meta tag. Unfortunately, unless you have the knowledge and want to edit your WordPress theme manually, there’s not an obvious way to add this.

Adding the “Definitely Allow Mobile Zooming” plugin makes this painless in WordPress without any additional configuration.

HTML code required (in <head>):

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" />

PHP required (for manual addition):

<?php
function set_viewport() {
?>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" />
<?php
}
add_action('wp_head', 'set_viewport');
?>

REFERENCES:

Selenium Firefox modifyheaders

A few of my tests require access to modify the HTTP Request headers. Unfortunately, Selenium hides access to them to allow for portability, and to better emulate what “users” generally can change. To work around this a Firefox extension can be used and configured at runtime for this purpose.

NOTE: for Maven, you need to place a copy of the .xpi file referenced into the /src/test/resources folder for Selenium to locate it.

In the example below, I’m setting the HTTP Header for “DNT” to “1”.

public FirefoxDriver createFirefoxDriver() throws URISyntaxException, IOException {
// Specify the install location (if not default)
System.setProperty("webdriver.firefox.bin","C:\\path\\to\\Firefox.exe");
// Prevent Console log "noise" from the Selenium Firefox plugin
System.setProperty("org.apache.commons.logging.Log", "org.apache.commons.logging.impl.SimpleLog");
System.setProperty("org.apache.commons.logging.simplelog.log.httpclient.wire", "OFF");
System.setProperty("org.apache.commons.logging.simplelog.log.org.apache.commons.httpclient", "OFF");

final FirefoxProfile profile = new FirefoxProfile();
final URL url = this.getClass().getResource("/modify_headers-0.7.1.1-fx.xpi");
final File modifyHeaders = modifyHeaders = new File(url.toURI());

profile.setEnableNativeEvents(false);
profile.addExtension(modifyHeaders);

profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.headers.count", 1);
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.headers.action0", "Add");
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.headers.name0", "DNT");
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.headers.value0", "1");
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.headers.enabled0", true);
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.config.active", true);
profile.setPreference("modifyheaders.config.alwaysOn", true);

final DesiredCapabilities capabilities = new DesiredCapabilities();
capabilities.setBrowserName("firefox");
capabilities.setPlatform(org.openqa.selenium.Platform.ANY);
capabilities.setCapability(FirefoxDriver.PROFILE, profile);
return new FirefoxDriver(capabilities);
}

Maven build script for replacement of text in web.xml (and others)

Automated replacement of BUILD_LABEL token in web.xml <description> with Maven. For JAR’s the replacement is commented out, but can be any file.

NOTE: This proves to be rather difficult to do because of the way that Maven copies resources as it’s building the WAR. The most reliable manner I’ve found (so far) is below, it works by making a .tmp copy of the web.xml in a different path and then later uses it in the WAR.


<plugins>
<plugin>
<groupId>com.google.code.maven-replacer-plugin</groupId>
<artifactId>replacer</artifactId>
<version>1.5.3</version>
<configuration>
<quiet>false</quiet>
</configuration>
<executions>
<execution>
<id>replaceBuildLabel</id>
<phase>prepare-package</phase>
<goals>
<goal>replace</goal>
</goals>
<configuration>
<file>${basedir}/src/main/webapp/WEB-INF/web.xml</file>
<outputFile>${project.build.directory}/web.xml.tmp</outputFile>
<replacements>
<replacement>
<token>BUILD_LABEL</token>
<value>Maven-${maven.build.timestamp}</value>
</replacement>
</replacements>
<regex>false</regex>
<quiet>false</quiet>
</configuration>
</execution>
</executions>
</plugin>
<plugin>
<groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
<artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
<version>2.5</version>
<configuration>
<failOnMissingWebXml>false</failOnMissingWebXml>
<webXml>${project.build.directory}/web.xml.tmp</webXml>
<archive>
<manifest>
<addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
<addDefaultSpecificationEntries>true</addDefaultSpecificationEntries>
</manifest>
<manifestEntries>
<url>${project.url}</url>
<Build-Label>${maven.build.timestamp}</Build-Label>
</manifestEntries>
</archive>
</configuration>
</plugin>
</plugins>

Most importantly, you will want to have this token in the web.xml file for replacement, the description line is best used for this as such:

<description>ExampleWAR [BUILD_LABEL]</description>

during the build, that value would be replaced to something like:

<description>ExampleWAR [Maven-20141015-1700]</description>

REFERENCES:

MKS IntegrityClient integration with Eclipse IDE

While the intgration plugins for most SCM products are done rather simply within Eclipse, MKS(now PTC) IntegrityClient requires a few manual steps.

Caution, the plugin has always been a bit “buggy” but nothing too annoying for daily use. I’ve personally used it since IBM WSAD 5.1(Eclipse 3.x based) up to and including the most current Eclipse Luna (4.4) release.

  1. Go to your MKS installation path, then find the “integrations” folder as in the example below:
    C:\MKS\IntegrityClient\integrations\IBM\eclipse_3.2\eclipse
  2. That folder SHOULD have two folders (features/plugins) as well as three files (.eclipseextension, artifacts.xml, content.xml)
  3. Copy the entire contents and paste/overlay into your ‘eclipse’ folder (where you should already have folders for ‘features/plugins)
  4. Restart Eclipse
  5. Configure as required.

Eclipse FileSync plugin

I’ve done a lot of front-end java coding over my career,  one particularly annoying aspect is the wait for a build (compile-deploy) cycle in my local developement servers to view or test a small change.  One particularly useful tool that I’ve been using for some time is a FileSync plugin for Eclipse.  It is useful as you can “map” folders from your Eclipse project to a path on your local filesystem, as such the individual files are automatically copied to your server installation.  I’ve personally used this approache with JBoss, Tomcat and WebSphere, but there is no reason that it should not work for other servers.